Gene Odening interview, Part 2 – “The QUADRIVIUM” – #050 (+ video)

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In tonight’s show we continue our discussion on the Trivium and discuss the Quadrivium with Gene Odening. Here we continue to learn about learning, logic, critical thinking, Hegelian dialectics, Plato, the Trivium, the Quadrivium, the 7 liberal arts, and many other facets of human cognizance.

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  13 comments for “Gene Odening interview, Part 2 – “The QUADRIVIUM” – #050 (+ video)

  1. August 30, 2011 at 4:57 am

    It is a real pisser when I accidentally bump an image or a link and the page is taken away to go to the new page.
    So we loose our place in the interview.

    the html attribute target=”_blank” will open a new page while leaving the old page in tact.

  2. August 30, 2011 at 4:58 am

    This website is a fucked up design.

  3. Carol Wilkins
    April 9, 2012 at 1:33 pm

    I ‘m so far behind having just discovered your website, unschooling a 16 year old and excited to share with him what has been fermenting ,or “fuzzy” as Gene states it, in my mind for the last decade of my 57 year old life, through sharing my discovery of these awesome podcasts. Thanks

  4. valiantx
    July 9, 2012 at 2:07 pm

    Great interview Jan.

    I do have one thing to rebut about the Atlantean lineage Odening was talking about, though I do believe Lemurias was in the Pacific and China is a remnant of the civilization too. I, like such authors as William Comyns Beaumont, William Fairfield Warren, Michael Tsarion, and other proponents of like minded researchers, believe atlantis was more than likely in the north sea area or the artic regions. As Warren hypothesized, as mentioned by Plato in his ‘Critias’ that Atlas was the first king of Atlantis and he stated that Homer, Virgil, and Hesiod all stated that Atlas resided at the ends of the world. The greeks also placed Atlas at the north star, so one should not find it too difficult to consider that is where atlantis was once too. Further more, the aryans came from the northwest into India and taught them incredible knowledge and technology, so how can it be the other way around?

    All in all, the subject location is still a bone of contention, but in opinion, its seems to lean more towards the northern climes than anywhere else.

  5. valiantx
    July 9, 2012 at 3:43 pm

    Lastly, Odening voice sounds very similar to the british actor Michael Caine.

    I myself have experienced induced psilocybin trips and have seen geometrical patterns manifest in my brain in all occasions; especially when I was playing video games, I could see the polygonal shapes without its coloring hues manifest that were hidden to my normal conscious state of mind. It also illuminated and expanded my five senses to a level of distinction I never experienced while sober i.e. when I touched a cold soda can, it was like touching it for the first time, but with an experienced mind and idea about such impressions, which I attempted to ‘try’ and logicize about, though foolishly yet not in vain.

    Thanks again for the interview.

  6. Jesse Gross
    September 9, 2012 at 1:34 pm

    Its too bad that Mr. Odening misunderstands the Freemason’s concept of “squaring the circle”, thus implicating them in attempting to turn us into “block heads”. As a Freemason, I can tell you that the Seven Liberal Arts and Sciences make up the better part of the second degree. I do agree that there is a system in place to keep us ignorant, but the Masons are no part of it.

    • Jan Irvin
      September 10, 2012 at 6:54 pm

      Right, that’s why the masons teach it out of order. But I suggest going through the citations and database provided here on the website and you’ll see that you’re entirely wrong.. .but then I’d expect you to say that – as you’re a mason.

  7. Joe Schmoe
    October 27, 2014 at 4:52 am

    Talk about fallacious arguments! I was listening to Gene’s talks to learn about the Trivium and Quadrivium. I’m a third of the way through the second one and he has barely touched on those two subjects. I’ll give anyone the benefit of the doubt and make allowances for them to allow their bias to slip in here and there without me entirely discounting their opinion on a matter, but this is getting ridiculous. The first logical fallacy that really caught my attention was him trying to say that the word God Carries the meaning of “G”eneration, “O”peration, and “D”esolution and that this is an obvious tie to the “same thing they were teaching in India and shows they are the same thing. Wow! What a stretch. If you would actually ask why, I’ll start with two obvious points. The first being the English word God is a translation of the Jewish word for God, which is never fully spelled out, but uses the letter YHWH. It is only the consonants. For reasons of purity and reverence the Jewish people believe it should never be spelled out or spoken. Reason number two. Gene has made up this “definition” of the word God and it has nothing to do with what Judeo/Christianity teaches about the Trinity. You can’t just go around making things up and then say, “See! I told you so!” I was willing to concede him his point by assuming that he was only trying to use this as an illustration of how they might share the same origin, although it seemed a very bad example.

    The second thing, which to me is so egregious in a number of overwhelming ways, is enough to make me say you should not accept any of what he is saying as true was his statement that almost all non-denominational mega-churches try to get you into a home fellowship where the groups are almost always 8 people and that there is always a covert operative in there who’s main purpose is to convince you to tithe. 10-15%. Good lord. That’s ridiculous and could not hold up to the slightest standards of logic that he says these entire talks are promoting. Gene and Jan’s dislike of mainstream Christianity is fine with me. To each their own. But to let your obvious bias be purported as fact falls right into several of the categories of false propositions.

    • October 28, 2014 at 10:50 am

      Nice way to take things out of context. Good job! That’s using the trivium. LOL.

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